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Spy Scholarship

10 Apr

To help kick off the third annual Edinburgh Spy Week, I thought I’d offer some thoughts on great works of espionage, intelligence, and surveillance scholarship. Below are a half dozen books that I think are essential for the reader interested in the world of intelligence. This is a personal list, and as such focuses on the twentieth century UK, USA, and USSR. So, no Elizabethan skullduggery, Great Game goings on, on anything like that, I’m afraid.
classified
Classified: Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain
, Christopher Moran, 2012

For anyone interested in the history of intersections between the British state, the media, the public, Chris Moran‘s Classified is a must read. The book takes a thematic approach, covering topics like the political memoirs, official histories of intelligence, and the groundbreaking work of Chapman Pincher. All of the themes covered are cleverly combined to offer a dynamic, comprehensive study of the multifaceted nature of secrecy in twentieth-century Britain.

Christopher Moran will be appearing at Spy Week 2016 talking about James Bond in fact and fiction.

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Banning Panorama: January 27, 2016

13 Jan

On the 27th of this month, I’ll be giving a paper as part of Glasgow Caledonian University’s regular History Seminar. This is especially pleasing for me, as GCU was where I spent my undergrad years in the 1990s.

GCU_Seminar_27_01

The paper is all about a component of my current postdoctoral research, which examines attempts by the Thatcher and Reagan governments to influence domestic and international public perceptions of intelligence and nuclear issues during the 1980s and the global media’s responses to this.

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A Post-doctoral Position, Hurrah!

20 Aug

iash_logoThe year or so since I had my PhD viva has been one of ups and downs, highs and lows. That, its seems, is the norm for the newly minted academic Doctor and something I entirely expected. In fact, it’s a subject that I’m writing a fairly long post on, but for now I’d like to talk about a recent ‘up’.

I’m delighted to say that I’ve been awarded a Post-doctoral Research Fellowship by the Institute for  Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) at the University of Edinburgh. The fellowship runs from September 2015 to May 2016 and allows me to research one of the building blocks of a much bigger post-doctoral project.

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